How To Layout A Disability Services Website For Easy Use

Sometimes, when using my computer or smartphone and accessing a particular website I am enraged with frustration at my failure to achieve my intention. Perhaps, it is my generation, the first to use digital devices and media, but not schooled in the process. Whatever it is, nothing gets me as angry as a website that will not play ball with its user.  I can only imagine that this might be a pale shadow of what it might be like being disabled in an ableist world. Nothing works properly for the way that you are made.

How To Layout A Disability Services Website For Easy Use

The virtual world and the real world are becoming less distinct and more one and the same in this twenty first century of our recorded human existence. The digital realm is all about recording accounts of things in pictures and text. It is history sped up into real time. Websites, not long ago, were seen as exotic flickerings on the small screens of our lives. Not something to bother real men, who worked with their muscles and hands. All that keyboard typing was women’s work for secretaries. Oh, how times have changed, my friend.

They key to laying out a disability services website for easy use, resides in logic and understanding how we as humans think. Websites can make us all feel confused and lost at sea, which is why they talk about navigation in content management and web design. Get out your whiteboards and magic markers folks and work out your blue print and a whole lot of charts. Critical thinking and the principles of web design must fit together like hand in glove. Know your purpose and communicate this clearly and logically. One example that stands out is here is award winning.

It is not that hard, but all the stakeholders must be on the same page. Think of your audience, your target market, your community of users, and what they want to find out. Grid based layouts and ‘F’ pattern designs, don’t get too fancy in fonts and typeface, keep the colours dancing to the appropriate tune, communicate the information with a minimum of unnecessary distraction and utilise great images to tell your story. If disability may contribute to a more challenging browsing experience for the end user, keep it simple and quick. Navigation that gets the user there concisely. Be Spartan, rather than overly wordy and flowery in look and feel. Be mobile friendly and keep load times to a minimum. Got it? Good.